SCENE ONE

So what's the problem? Is there a problem? I mean really; all of this, for this?

But why this? Why now? Why even bother? It's so old school, right?

Well old school's got some kick to it. But I'm getting ahead of myself.

So, first things first. Who am I to tell you anything? What do I know?

Well I'm fairly easy to locate online. Look me up. I got game.

But I also have this knack. This habit. This skill.

Let us call it the habit of highly effective computing. This, for me, has been the single most important thing I've ever developed on the PC.

And it’s no secret. It's been part of Windows from the start. But no one's ever put it together like this. Not that I've seen. And I've worked in offices in Manhattan and I've been in the deep south. And I've seen a lot of people use a PC.

Parents. You wanna really prep your kid’s for their future? This is a no-brainer. You get them doing this, now. It is insanely intuitive and ridiculously powerful.

So...ready to be better than anyone you know on the PC? Like that?

C’mon. This won't take long.

SCENE TWO

This is good. Well, here we are. Welcome back.


To the summer of '85. July 3rd to be exact. A pretty classic summer.

A pretty pivotal time for the PC too. A lot was about to happen toward end of year.

But let's just hang here for a minute and breathe in what was.

What? You were expecting...?

Here's what was.

We had computers, which ran software, which helped us to do our stuff. And we did our stuff. Lots of stuff. All the stuff, with computers. And all we had to use were our keys.

But toward the end of the year everything got graphic. And with this change came a new device. A device very well suited to moving graphics around a screen. Yet very ill suited to doing much of anything else.

Interestingly, as has been revealed, they even coerced us into getting used to it.
With a game. And everyone loved the idea.

"Oh, let's all drag and drop!"

And for reasons I will never understand, everyone went with it. They use it for
everything. It's like; mankind truly believes he's being more productive with it.

You know, when Windows first hit, us DOS guys; we all said "oh no, there goes our speed. And we were right.

You have no idea how relatively unproductive you are at this moment.

Folks. Believe it or not, for all the common tasks that we all do with a PC; you don't need your mouse.

Alright, let's put it this way. Do you see all these commands here? In order to do any of these, the moment that your hand lifts to just reach for the mouse; you've just incapacitated yourself (so far as time goes). Absolutely. It's like you've just slowed yourself down, conservatively, three hundred percent.

It's like driving with one foot on the brake.

When you see what I'm about to show you...well, don't be too hard on yourself is all I have to say.

But enough of that. We've a schedule to keep. C'mon! We're getting close to getting good.

SCENE THREE

I shared all this with an engineer recently. She kept asking, "Is it a process? Is
it a method?" Well it's neither. It's a system. Systems address efficiency. And
systems work. Everyone knows that.

Well, except maybe engineers.

My dad was a master craftsman. And I grew up in his shop. I learned early on about
jigging stuff out. A jig is any device that'll hold your work for you while you're
forming or joining it. A jig allows you to build predictable, repeatable versions
of things. The jig is the system.

So, what's the system here? Alright, check it out.

The keys? They never move. Same place. Every time. All the time. Each has its own
function, and each does the same thing; predictably and repeatedly every time it's
pressed. You don't even have to be neat about it. Just hit the key.

Yeah, I know. I know. "Hello!" It's obvious.

But that's where the speed and the efficiency of the system lies. You could turn
your screen around, and knowing your directory structure; navigate with absolute
accuracy knowing what each key being pressed is doing. That's a fool-proof system.

Can't do that with a mouse, so there must be something else going on there.

Of course there is. Using a mouse is about as finely tuned a motor skill as you're likely to find. Serious. That's why they felt the need to train us on it.

Think about it. Eyes, mind, hand. All coordinating in chasing tiny targets around on screen, to perform the same functions that take fractions of seconds with your keys.

I've had enough. Let's move on.

CLOSING

Alright, so what all's involved?

Well you'll be happy to know that there's basically four keys that do everything. Assuming you're okay with your alphabet, know your directions, and can maybe handle another miscellaneous cluster or two of easily identifiable keys; we'll be through this fairly easily.

This is where I duck out and we dig in. My sincere desire is that you are as blessed by this as I've always been. We are bombarded by claims. I make none. But you give this a good try, and you'll see. You're operating at a much higher level with this.

And it's easy. Playful even.

Welcome. Welcome back. I'll see you in class.